Antique Collector - Blue & White Transferware


Blue & White Transferware
"Blue and white wares" designate white pottery and porcelain decorated under the glaze with a blue pigment, generally cobalt oxide. Decoration is commonly applied by hand, stencilling or transfer-printing, though other methods have also been used. The first blue and white wares were made in China as early as the 9thC in Henan province. By the beginning of the 17th century Chinese blue and white porcelain was being exported directly to Europe. Oriental blue and white porcelain was highly prized in Europe and America and was collected by kings and princes.
European manufacture started at Meissen in Germany in 1707. Early wares were strongly influenced by Chinese and other Oriental porcelains. The production of English porcelain started at Worcester, nearly forty years after Meissen, Oriental blue and white wares providing the inspiration for much of the decoration used. Many other European factories followed this trend.


Blue and White Pottery


Miller's Collector's Guide: Blue and White Pottery
by Gillian Neale
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4 Star



The wide range of pottery decorated in blue and white with intricate transfer-printed patterns is popular among collectors. Intended as an introduction to the subject, this guide provides information on materials, techniques, manufacturers, and styles. "Fact Files" highlight key aspects of each subject, show manufacturers' identifying marks and feature tips on collecting.


Miller's Collecting Blue and White Pottery
by Gillian Neale
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0 Star



The newest addition to an authoritative collecting series, Miller's Collecting Blue & White Pottery begins with a comprehensive discussion of the introduction and development of blue printed pottery, including the manufacturing processes, and why you should want to collect it. A collection has far more value as a whole if it is held together by a coherent theme.



Blues made from cobalt were first used widely for painted decoration in China during the fifteenth century. Much of the porcelain imported into Europe was decorated with blue designs, and after about 1650, when tea was introduced, the volume of blue and white 'chinaware' brought back from Canton was enormous. European potters tried to emulate this fine tableware.


Blue and White Transfer-Printed Pottery
by Robert Copeland
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0 Star



Chinese blue and white porcelain was a unique contribution to the history of ceramic technology. From its development at the beginning of the fourteenth century, and through its technical originality and artistic brilliance in intervening years, it has continued to captivate and inspire around the world. This beautifully illustrated book traces the history and evolution of blue and white in China.


Blue and White: Chinese Porcelain Around the World John Carswell
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0 Star




Meissen's Blue and White Porcelain
by Nicholas Zumbulyadis
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0 Star



Product details
Hardcover: 219 pages
Publisher: Schiffer Publishing Ltd (Sep 2006)
Language English
ISBN-10: 0764324829
ISBN-13: 978-0764324826
Dimensions: 28.2 x 22.6 x 2.8 cm


Persia and China: Safavid Blue and White Ceramics in the Victoria and Albert Museum 1501-1738
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0 Star



Persia and China is the first catalogue raisonne to explore the collection of Blue and White Persian ceramics of the Safavid dynasty in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. It is a study of over 500 pieces of glazed ceramics mainly from the 17th and 18th centuries. Most of the collection was acquired over a century ago in Persia for the South Kensington Museum.



Product details
Hardcover: 288 pages
Publisher: Broadway Books (28 Oct 2008)
Language English
ISBN-10: 0767921135
ISBN-13: 978-0767921138


A Passion for Blue and White
by Carolyne Roehm
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0 Star



This dictionary brings together many facts about blue and white printed pottery at the height of its popularity and prodution.


The Dictionary of Blue and White Printed Pottery, 1780-1880: v.1
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4 Star



British Tea and Coffee Cups, 1745-1940
by Steve Goss
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0 Star



Tea and coffee cups are amongst the most collectable of all ceramics. They are easily found, appear in all kinds of shapes and patterns, are decorative to look at, are easily displayed and can be relatively inexpensive. The changes in design reflect the advances made in manufacturing processes and materials as well as changes in the fashions of society.


Miller's British Transfer-printed Pottery,1790 - 1930 by Gillian Neale
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0 Star



Beginning with a short introduction to printed (transferware) pottery, this unique guide is then divided by subject category, such as Animals, Buildings, Chinoiserie etc. Each colour photograph has essential information on pattern, maker, date, available colours, and any other useful items such as whether the pattern is particularly rare or was specifically made for export.

Star Rating: Customers who review books often leave a star rating. Where known, I have recreated this information to give you an idea of how popular the book was deemed by readers, researchers, collectors and dealers. Star Rating is for guidance only.

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